Author: Broderick Chow

Call for Proposals: Sport­ / Spectacle: Performing, Labouring, Circulating Bodies Across Sport, Theatre, Dance, and Live Art

Friday 14 and Saturday 15 September 2018, Kings College London, Strand Campus Day 1, Keynote and Screening with Jennifer Doyle, 14 September, 7:00 PM – 9:00 PM, Nash Lecture Theatre Day 2, Papers, Workshops, and Performances, 15 September, 10:00 AM – 6:00 PM, Anatomy Museum. Reception to follow. Organized by Broderick D.V. Chow (Brunel University London), the Dynamic Tensions: A Research Network for Theatre, Performance, Sport, and Physical Culture, and the Kings College London Arts and Humanities Research Institute. Supported by the Arts and Humanities Research Council and Brunel University London. Call for Proposals: Papers, Provocations, Performances, Workshops (Deadline 2 July 2018) “It is fundamentally wrong to pay more attention to the dead weight lifted, than to the living body that lifts it” — George Hackenschmidt, wrestler, physical culturist, performer and philosopher, Vienna, 1925. At the centre of both sport and cultural performance are bodies. In the spectacles of professional or amateur sport, plays, musicals, dance, and opera, bodies are made to transcend their fleshly existence by the mise-en-scène and the audience contract. The (sport) spectacle transforms the embodied subject of the athlete/actor into a representation of human potential and possibility. At the same time, bodies are the primary medium, material, tool, and commodity of the spectacle: they are circulated, exploited, bloodied, bruised, and torn apart. This spectacularization/exploitation of the body’s potentiality intersects with other embodied racialized, gendered, and sexual experiences and identities. What...

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Theatre and Sport Panel: Recorded Talks

Unfortunately, owing to this week’s snowfall across the UK, our two speakers for the Performance and Sport panel hosted by London Theatre Seminar / Dynamic Tensions were unable to travel to give their talks. However, both Solomon Lennox and Claire Warden were kind enough to record their talks to share with an online audience. Please share! Towards a Heterotopology of the Boxing Ring on the Contemporary Stage, by Dr P. Solomon Lennox ‘Rest in peace’: performing silence in professional wrestling Youtube videos for Claire’s Talk: 0:34 (The Undertaker vs. Mankind) 8:44 (The Nexus Invasion — starting at 14:20) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vVVtqoqzgNw?showinfo=0&start=860&w=560&h=315 19:19 (Shinsuke Nakamusa...

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Theatre and Sport Panel with Solomon Lennox (Northumbria) and Claire Warden (De Monfort), 1 March 2018

I am pleased to announce an interdisciplinary seminar on Theatre and Sport, in conjunction with the London Theatre Seminar. Our speakers will be Dr Solomon Lennox of Northumbria University, and Dr Claire Warden of De Monfort University, and the seminar will investigate the theatrical/sportive stage of the boxing and wrestling ring. It takes place 1 March 2018 in the University of London Senate House (Room G35). Start time is 6:30 PM. The seminar will close at 8:30, to reconvene in a local pub. Wine and refreshments will be served. Theatre and Sport Seminar: Staging the Boxing and Wrestling Ring The Royale, by Marco Ramirez. The Old Globe, San Diego Towards a Heterotopology of the Boxing Ring on the Contemporary Stage Boxing rings have the potential to be heterotopias, wherein specific and peculiar heterochronic performance practice takes place. Boxing rings as counter-sites are capable of juxtaposing in the single real place several spaces. They are part crisis heterotopia and part heterotopia of deviation; spaces of the illusory and spaces that are other. Boxing rings are paradoxical spaces. They close in on their boxer-occupants to produce feelings of isolation and loneliness, whilst simultaneously providing temporal, sensorial, and spatial openings, which disturb isolating boundaries by producing networks of connection. This paper provides a heterotopology of the boxing ring on the contemporary stage and grapples with the paradoxical nature of boxing rings as heterotopias. The main...

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Event Announcement: Agonistic Politics in Performance, 24 March 2018

The TaPRA Bodies and Performance Working Group and Brunel University London is pleased to announce a second workshop/interim event: Agonistic politics in performance: practices of difference, disagreement, and respect in theatre, dance, and sport 24 March 2018, Brunel University London Organized by Janet O’Shea (UCLA) Keynote Presentation by Alex Channon (Brighton) The global rise of right wing populism has fueled a politics of disrespect in which racism, misogyny, and xenophobia are celebrated as the counter-balance to political correctness, and callous disregard is taken as necessary in a time of precarity. In response to this valorization of vitriol, poster artist Shepard Fairey (2016) argues that the mechanisms of democracy and specifically the creation of public policy require a degree of civility. David Palumbo-Liu (2014), by contrast, maintains that civility can squash dissent, discourage debate, squelch non-mainstream political positions, and maintain the status quo. Indeed, Chantal Mouffe (2013) suggests that the path to true democracy is through agonistic politics, and philosopher Erin Manning (2006) argues for dissensus, rather than consensus, as the basis of cooperation. This one-day workshop seeks to examine politics of disagreement, debate, and “agonistic respect” (Connolly 1993) in the context of theater, dance, sport, and other forms of performance. Performance, and artistic production more generally, has long been considered a site for dissent. However, most studies of dissent in theatre have investigated content rather than form. Does performance...

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The Dynamic Tensions Physical Culture Show: Documentation

The Dynamic Tensions Physical Culture Show was performed on 13 October 2017, at the Anatomy Museum, Kings College London. This one-off performance event brought together athletes and artists to explore the history of physical culture on the theatrical stage. This film, documenting the entirety of the performance, was made by Alexandros Papathanasiou.

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